Ver Conjugation | How to Conjugate Ver in Spanish

María José Escobar Published on February 21, 2023

In this article, we’ll look at what the Spanish verb ver means and how to use it. I’ll walk you through the different conjugations of ver and provide a conjugation chart for each tense. You’ll also have some example sentences to help you practice. Let’s get started!

The verb ver most closely means “to see” in English, but it can also mean “to watch,” “to view,” or “to look.” As one of many irregular verbs in Spanish, ver doesn’t follow a common conjugation pattern so you’ll need to learn its conjugations in different tenses.

Note that in English, “see” and “watch” have similar meanings but are used in different situations. Something similar happens with ver in Spanish. Ver is used almost the same as the verb “to see” but it can sometimes be used as the verb “to watch.” For example, to say “I’ll watch the game” you’d say “Yo voy a ver el partido.”

Let’s begin by taking a look at the three most common conjugations of this verb: the infinitive, the gerund, and the past participle.

ver conjugation table

Here are three example sentences that use the conjugations of ver from the table above:

  • Infinitive: Podremos ver las estrellas hoy. (We’ll be able to see the stars today.)
  • Gerund: Estamos viendo una película. (We are watching a movie.)
  • Past Participle: He visto muchos pájaros últimamente. (I’ve seen a lot of birds lately.)

Now that you know the meaning of ver, you can start learning all of its different conjugations. In the table below, click on the tense you want to learn to see a description, conjugation chart, and example sentences for each tense:

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How to Conjugate Ver in Indicative Tense

We use indicative tenses in Spanish to speak about the current reality. This mood helps us express ideas or facts that are considered to be true. All conjugations of this mood have the same stem ve- or vi- and different endings. We’ll go over the following tenses: present, future, preterite, imperfect, and conditional.

Indicative Present

The indicative present is one of the most commonly used verb forms of ver. We use it to talk about actions or events happening now or events that will happen in the near future. It also helps us describe absolute statements or talk about routines.

In the following table, you can see a conjugation chart for the present tense of ver in Spanish:

PronounVer ConjugationEnglish Meaning
YoVeoI see
VesYou see
VosVesYou see
Él/Ella/UstedVeHe/She sees, You see
NosotrosVemosWe see
VosotrosVeisYou see
Ellos/Ellas/ UstedesVenThey see, You see

Here are some example sentences showing how to conjugate ver in the indicative present tense:

  • Vemos la misma película todas las Navidades. (We watch the same movie every Christmas.)
  • Ellos solo ven documentales. (They only watch documentaries.)
  • Siempre veo el pronóstico del clima antes de salir. (I always see the weather forecast before going out.)

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Indicative Future

We use the future tense to refer to an action or event that will most likely happen. The indicative future also helps us talk about intentions or probabilities. Note that this is one of the most frequently used future tenses in Spanish.

Below is a table of how to conjugate ver in the indicative future tense:

PronounVer ConjugationEnglish Meaning
YoVeréI will see
VerásYou will see
VosVerásYou will see
Él/Ella/UstedVeráHe/She/You will see
NosotrosVeremosWe will see
VosotrosVeréisYou will see
Ellos/Ellas/ UstedesVeránThey will see, You will see

Here are some example sentences showing how to conjugate ver in the indicative future tense:

  • Veré si puedo pasar por el supermercado más tarde. (I’ll see if I can go by the supermarket later.)
  • ¡Quién sabe qué película verán! (Who knows what movie they’ll watch!)
  • Veremos los fuegos artificiales esta noche. (We will see the fireworks tonight.)

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Indicative Preterite

The indicative preterite is one of the most common past tense forms of ver. We use it to describe events or actions that were completed in the past. You’ll usually see this tense used with a time marker but it can also be used without one.

In the table below you can see the conjugations for the verb ver in the indicative preterite tense:

PronounVer ConjugationEnglish Meaning
YoViI saw
VisteYou saw
VosVisteYou saw
Él/Ella/UstedVioHe/She/You saw
NosotrosVimosWe saw
VosotrosVisteisYou saw
Ellos/Ellas/ UstedesVieronThey saw, You saw

Here are some example sentences showing how to conjugate ver in the indicative preterite tense:

  • Vi que lanzaron una nueva canción. (I saw that they released a new song.)
  • Él me dijo que vio todo en orden. (He told me that he saw everything in order.)
  • La semana pasada vimos un partido de béisbol. (Last week we watched a baseball game.)

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Indicative Imperfect

We use the imperfect tense to refer to past events that were recurring. It’s often used to talk about routines, traditions, or experiences in the past. Even though the Spanish word for “used to” is “solía,” you can also think of the translation in this tense as “used to see” to emphasize that it’s used for repeated past events.

Here’s the indicative imperfect conjugation chart for ver:

PronounVer ConjugationEnglish Meaning
YoVeíaI saw
VeíasYou saw
VosVeíasYou saw
Él/Ella/UstedVeíaHe/She/You saw
NosotrosVeíamosWe saw
VosotrosVeíaisYou saw
Ellos/Ellas/ UstedesVeíanThey saw, You saw

Here are some example sentences showing how to conjugate ver in the indicative imperfect tense:

  • Veías ese programa de televisión cuando eras una niña pequeña. (You used to watch that TV show when you were a little girl.)
  • Nosotros veíamos caer la nieve durante el invierno. (We saw the snow falling during the winter.)
  • Él siempre veía el vaso medio lleno. (He always saw the glass half full.)

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Indicative Conditional

The conditional tense helps us speak about a future event that will only happen if another one takes place. We also use it to describe intentions or desires of the future. You’ll likely see it used along with words like “if” or “when.”

The table below is a conjugation chart of ver for the indicative conditional tense:

PronounVer ConjugationEnglish Meaning
YoVeríaI would see
VeríasYou would see
VosVeríasYou would see
Él/Ella/UstedVeríaHe/She/You would see
NosotrosVeríamosWe would see
VosotrosVeríaisYou would see
Ellos/Ellas/ UstedesVeríanThey would see, You would see

Here are some example sentences showing how to conjugate ver in the indicative conditional tense:

  • Vería el partido contigo pero tengo trabajo qué hacer. (I would watch the game with you but I have work to do.)
  • ¿Verías si los niños están dormidos cuando subas? (Would you see if the kids are asleep when you go upstairs?)
  • Veríamos la serie si tuviéramos ese servicio de streaming. (We would watch the show if we had that streaming service.)

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How to Conjugate Ver in Perfect Tense

We use perfect tenses to talk about past actions that happened recently or events that will happen in the future. All perfect tenses are compound. That means they are made up of the helping verb haber and the past participle of ver (visto). The conjugations of ver in this tense are the present perfect, future perfect, past perfect, conditional perfect, and preterite perfect.

Present Perfect

The present perfect tense helps us speak about actions or events that were completed immediately before the present. We can also use this tense to talk about experiences or relevant situations that connect to the present.

Below is a table of how to conjugate ver in the present perfect tense:

PronounVer ConjugationEnglish Meaning
YoHe vistoI have seen
Has vistoYou have seen
VosHas vistoYou have seen
Él/Ella/UstedHa vistoHe/She has seen, You have seen
NosotrosHemos vistoWe have seen
VosotrosHabéis vistoYou have seen
Ellos/Ellas/ UstedesHan vistoThey have seen, You have seen

Here are some example sentences showing how to conjugate ver in the present perfect tense:

  • Ya he visto esa serie antes. (I have seen that show before.)
  • Hemos visto a Gabriel varias veces esta semana. (We have seen Gabriel a few times this week.)
  • ¿Habéis visto la tabla de puntajes? (Have you seen the scoreboard?)

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Future Perfect

We use the future perfect to refer to something that will be completed in the future. It can help us express possibilities or wishes. It can also help us indicate something that might have or could have happened, in the past.

Here’s the conjugation chart for ver in the future perfect tense:

PronounVer ConjugationEnglish Meaning
YoHabré vistoI will have seen
Habrás vistoYou will have seen
VosHabrás vistoYou will have seen
Él/Ella/UstedHabrá vistoHe/She/You will have seen
NosotrosHabremos vistoWe will have seen
VosotrosHabréis vistoYou will have seen
Ellos/Ellas/ UstedesHabrán vistoThey will have seen, You will have seen

Here are some example sentences showing how to conjugate ver in the future perfect tense:

  • Habré visto esa película por tercera vez esta noche. (I will have seen that movie for the third time tonight.)
  • Como ya lo habrás visto, hemos remodelado el edificio. (As you will have seen, we have remodeled the building.)
  • Ellos habrán visto la isla desde el avión. (They will have seen the island from the airplane.)

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Past Perfect (Pluperfect)

The past perfect tense is used to describe an action that was completed before another action in the past. It also helps us make hypotheses about the past. You might often see this verb being used along with a conjunction like “if” or “when.”

In the table below, you’ll see how to conjugate ver in the past perfect tense:

PronounVer ConjugationEnglish Meaning
YoHabía vistoI had seen
Habías vistoYou had seen
VosHabías vistoYou had seen
Él/Ella/UstedHabía vistoHe/She/You had seen
NosotrosHabíamos vistoWe had seen
VosotrosHabíais vistoYou had seen
Ellos/Ellas/ UstedesHabían vistoThey had seen, You had seen

Here are some example sentences showing how to conjugate ver in the past perfect tense:

  • Nunca la había visto antes. (I had never seen her before.)
  • Creí que ya habías visto la noticia. (I thought you had already seen the news.)
  • ¿Alguna vez habíais visto algo tan hermoso? (Had you ever seen something so beautiful?)

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Conditional Perfect

We use the conditional perfect tense to talk about an action that would have happened in the past but didn’t. It can also help us describe probabilities of past events or theories of what could have been.

Below you’ll find a conjugation chart for ver in the conditional perfect tense:

PronounVer ConjugationEnglish Meaning
YoHabría vistoI would have seen
Habrías vistoYou would have seen
VosHabrías vistoYou would have seen
Él/Ella/UstedHabría vistoHe/She/You have seen
NosotrosHabríamos vistoWe would have seen
VosotrosHabríais vistoYou would have seen
Ellos/Ellas/ UstedesHabrían vistoThey would have seen, You would have seen

Here are some example sentences showing how to conjugate ver in the conditional perfect tense:

  • Habría visto el mensaje a tiempo, pero no revisé mi celular. (I would have seen the message on time but I didn’t check my phone.)
  • Lo habrían visto si hubieran estado a tiempo. (You would have seen it if you had been on time.)
  • Si se hubiera ido, lo habríamos visto. (If he had left, we would have seen him.)

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Preterite Perfect (Past Anterior)

In Spanish, we use the preterite perfect tense to talk about an event that happened before another event in the past. This tense is rarely used in spoken Spanish anymore and you might come across it in older literature. In its place, we now use the indicative preterite tense.

Take a look at the following table to see the conjugations of ver in preterite perfect:

PronounVer ConjugationEnglish Meaning
YoHube vistoI saw
Hubiste vistoYou saw
VosHubiste vistoYou saw
Él/Ella/UstedHubo vistoHe/She/You saw
NosotrosHubimos vistoWe saw
VosotrosHubisteis vistoYou saw
Ellos/Ellas/ UstedesHubieron vistoThey saw, You saw

Here are some example sentences showing how to conjugate ver in the preterite perfect tense:

  • Cuando lo hube visto, corrí a avisar al resto. (When I saw it, I ran to warn the others.)
  • ¡Qué bueno que hubisteis visto la noticia a tiempo! (It’s so good that you saw the news in time!)
  • Me pregunto si ellos hubieron visto el aviso para voltear a la derecha. (I wonder if they saw the sign to turn right.)

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How to Conjugate Ver in Subjunctive Tense

Subjunctive tenses in Spanish help us express subjectivity or events that are unreal. We use them to describe hypotheses, wishes, desires, emotions, or possibilities. We conjugate in this mood using the stem ve– or vi- and different endings. The subjunctive tenses are the present subjunctive, future subjunctive, and imperfect subjunctive.

Present Subjunctive

The present subjunctive helps us describe present or future events that are uncertain. We can use it to express desires, possibilities, guesses, or recommendations. It’s common to see it in conditional phrases along with conjunctions like “if” or “when.”

In the table below, you’ll find the present subjunctive conjugations for ver:

PronounVer ConjugationEnglish Meaning
YoVeaI see
VeasYou see
VosVeasYou see
Él/Ella/UstedVeaHe/She sees, You see
NosotrosVeamosWe see
VosotrosVeáisYou see
Ellos/Ellas/ UstedesVean They see, You see

Here are some example sentences showing how to conjugate ver in the present subjunctive tense:

  • Cuando lo veas, dile que la comida está lista. (When you see him, tell him that dinner is ready.)
  • Quisiera que ellos vean la nueva casa. (I would like for them to see the new house.)
  • Ojalá que veamos una aurora boreal en nuestro viaje. (Let’s hope that we see an aurora borealis on our trip.)

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Future Subjunctive

The future subjunctive tense is used to refer to present or future actions, very much like the present subjunctive. It’s used to express hypotheses of future events or to describe conditionality. This tense has become practically obsolete and you may only find it in literature or law-related texts.

The following is a conjunction chart for ver in the future subjunctive tense:

PronounVer ConjugationEnglish Meaning
YoViereI see
VieresYou see
VosVieresYou see
Él/Ella/UstedViereHe/She sees, You see
NosotrosViéremosWe see
VosotrosViereisYou see
Ellos/Ellas/ UstedesVierenThey see, You see

Here are some example sentences showing how to conjugate ver in the future subjunctive tense:

  • Quien viere la conferencia tendrá puntos extra. (Whoever sees the conference will have extra points.)
  • Si viéremos el partido, tendremos que llegar a casa a estudiar. (If we watch the game, we’ll have to get home to study.)
  • Cuando vieres a tus hermanos, avísales que la cena está lista. (When you see your brothers, let them know dinner is ready.)

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Imperfect Subjunctive

We use the imperfect subjunctive tense to talk about past situations or unlikely events. This tense also helps us describe conditional events, wishes, or doubts. You’ll notice that there are two different conjugations for this verb. They both mean exactly the same, except we use the -era ending mostly in Latin countries and the -ese ending mostly in Spain.

Below is a conjugation chart of the imperfect subjunctive tense of ver:

PronounVer ConjugationEnglish Meaning
YoViera/ VieseI saw
Vieras/ ViesesYou saw
VosVieras/ ViesesYou saw
Él/Ella/UstedViera/ VieseHe/She/You saw
NosotrosViéramos/ ViésemosWe saw
VosotrosVierais/ VieseisYou saw
Ellos/Ellas/ UstedesVieran/ ViesenThey saw, You saw

Here are some example sentences showing how to conjugate ver in the imperfect subjunctive tense:

  • Si él viera el pronóstico del tiempo antes de salir, no se mojaría. (If he saw the weather forecast before going out, he wouldn’t get wet.)
  • Dudo que ellos viesen el documental para la tarea de hoy. (I doubt that they saw the documentary for today’s homework.)
  • Sería genial que vosotros vierais nuestro proyecto. (It would be great if you saw our project.)

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How to Conjugate Ver in Perfect Subjunctive Tense

We use the perfect subjunctive when referring to past actions connected to the present or to future situations that may or may not happen. We’ll go over the following tenses: present perfect subjunctive, future perfect subjunctive, and pluperfect subjunctive.

Present Perfect Subjunctive

We use the present perfect subjunctive to talk about actions or events that happened before the sentence’s main clause. The action can be past or future, depending on the context of the sentence. It’s quite common to find this verb in phrases with conditional conjunctions.

The table below is a chart for the Spanish ver conjunctions in the present perfect subjunctive:

PronounVer ConjugationEnglish Meaning
YoHaya vistoI have seen
Hayas vistoYou have seen
VosHayas vistoYou have seen
Él/Ella/UstedHaya vistoHe/She has seen, You have seen
NosotrosHayamos vistoWe have seen
VosotrosHayáis vistoYou have seen
Ellos/Ellas/ UstedesHayan vistoThey have seen, You have seen

Here are some example sentences showing how to conjugate ver in the present perfect subjunctive tense:

  • Cuando hayamos visto el menú decidiremos qué comer. (When we have seen the menu we’ll decide what to eat.)
  • Probablemente ya hayas visto el nuevo centro comercial. (You have probably seen the new mall already.)
  • Veremos esa película a menos que ya la hayan visto. (We’ll watch that movie unless you have already seen it.)

Return to Conjugation Table

Future Perfect Subjunctive

The future perfect subjunctive is used to talk about an action that will be completed at a certain point in the future. It also helps us describe actions that happened before another action in the past. This tense is no longer used in modern Spanish and you may occasionally find it in older literature or legal documents.

Below is a table of how to conjugate ver in the future perfect subjunctive:

PronounVer ConjugationEnglish Meaning
YoHubiere vistoI have seen
Hubieres vistoYou have seen
VosHubieres vistoYou have seen
Él/Ella/UstedHubiere vistoHe/She has seen, You have seen
NosotrosHubiéremos vistoWe have seen
VosotrosHubiereis vistoYou have seen
Ellos/Ellas/ UstedesHubieren vistoThey have seen, You have seen

Here are some example sentences showing how to conjugate ver in the future perfect subjunctive tense:

  • Espero que hubieres visto el itinerario antes de salir. (I hope you have seen the itinerary before going out.)
  • No creo que ellos hubieren visto la noticia o nos habrían dicho. (I don’t think that they have seen the news, or they would have told us.)
  • Ojalá él no haya visto esta obra antes. (Hopefully, he hasn’t seen this play before.)

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Pluperfect Subjunctive

We use the pluperfect subjunctive to express wishes or desires of what could have been. It can also help us describe events that could have happened but didn’t. This verb tense is typically used along with conditional conjunctions like “if” or “when.”

Here’s the conjunction chart for ver in the pluperfect subjunctive:

PronounVer ConjugationEnglish Meaning
YoHubiera/ Hubiese vistoI had seen
Hubieras/ Hubieses vistoYou had seen
VosHubieras/ Hubieses vistoYou had seen
Él/Ella/UstedHubiera/ Hubiese vistoHe/She/You had seen
NosotrosHubiéramos/ Hubiésemos vistoWe had seen
VosotrosHubierais/ Hubieseis vistoYou had seen
Ellos/Ellas/ UstedesHubieran/ Hubiesen vistoThey had seen, You had seen

Here are some example sentences showing how to conjugate ver in the pluperfect subjunctive tense:

  • Si hubiéramos visto el aviso antes, habríamos volteado por ahí. (If we had seen the sign before, we would have made a turn there.)
  • Ojalá hubiéramos visto a toda la familia esta Navidad. (I wish we had seen the entire family this Christmas.)
  • Me sorprendió que hubiérais visto esa obra. (I was surprised that you had seen that play.)

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How to Conjugate Ver in the Imperative Tense

In Spanish, we use the imperative mood to give recommendations, instructions, commands or to make requests. There are two forms of using this tense: the affirmative and the negative. When asking someone to perform an action, you’d use the conjugated verb alone, no subject is needed. If you want to ask someone not do to something, you’d add “no” before the negative conjugation.

Below is a chart of the imperative conjugation of the verb ver:

PronounVer Conjugation (Affirmative)Ver Conjugation (Negative)English Meaning
¡Ve!¡No veas!See/Don’t see!
Vos¡Ve!¡No veas!See/Don’t see!
Él/Ella/Usted¡Vea!¡No vea!See/Don’t see!
Nosotros¡Veamos!¡No veamos!See/Don’t see!
Vosotros¡Ved!¡No veáis!See/Don’t see!
Ellos/Ellas/ Ustedes¡Vean!¡No vean!See/Don’t see!

Here are some example sentences showing how to conjugate ver in the imperative tense:

  • ¡Ve a ver qué pasó! (Go see what happened!)
  • ¡Veamos el partido! (Let’s watch the game!)
  • No vean la película hasta que terminen la tarea. (Don’t watch the movie until you finish your homework.)

Return to Conjugation Table

Tips for Conjugating Ver Correctly

Conjugating irregular verbs can be a challenge at first. Don’t get frustrated if you find yourself having trouble conjugating ver in all tenses. Instead, try to begin by learning the ones that will allow you to describe most situations! For instance, indicative tenses like the present or future come in handy in common situations. Some common expressions using these tenses are “Ya veremos” which means “We’ll see” or “¡Nos vemos!” which translates to “See you later!”.

Ver can be a tricky verb to use since it can mean to look, to watch, or to see. English speakers sometimes confuse this ver with the verb mirar. A quick tip to know when to use ver is to ask yourself if the situation you want to talk about demands a lot of attention. We use ver for situations that don’t require much attention and mirar for situations that do. However, when you’re watching TV or any entertainment-related event, you always say ver when you’d say watch! You’ll get the gist of it with practice, so don’t be afraid to get it wrong a few times as you begin.

Ways to Practice Conjugating Ver

Ver is one of the most commonly used verbs in Spanish, so it’s necessary to learn how to use it. The best way to learn and remember is to practice. Fortunately, there are many ways to practice Spanish no matter how you prefer to learn. One of the most common ways is to use a Spanish language app. They are interactive and can help you learn vocabulary and basic grammar quickly. But if you want more explanation, a self-study book or an online course is a better choice.

However way you choose to learn, it’s important to dedicate the time and effort to master the material. Learning Spanish verb conjugations is often one of the most difficult aspects for English speakers to figure out. But with time and patience, you’ll know all the ways to use the verb ver!

Ver Conjugation FAQ

How do you conjugate the verb ver?

To conjugate the verb ver we can start by deciding whether we want to use a past, present, or future tense. Once we have decided, we can choose a mood and tense that suits what we want to say best. For instance, common tenses that you can use for the past are the indicative preterite or conditional. For the present, you’ll most likely use the indicative present. For the future, you can always rely on the indicative future tense.

What is the past tense of ver?

The most common past tense form of ver is vi, which is in the indicative preterite tense. Some other common past tense forms of ver are veía (indicative imperfect) or había visto (past perfect).

What verb is viendo?

Viendo is the gerund conjugation for ver in Spanish. We use gerunds to describe ongoing actions. For instance, to say “I am seeing” we’d use the gerund conjugation of ver and say “Yo estoy viendo.”

What does the verb ver mean?

The verb ver most frequently means “to see.” However, it can also mean to watch, to view, or to look. You’ll find that this is a very versatile and commonly used verb in Spanish, and it’ll come in handy to describe a variety of situations.

María José Escobar

Maria is a Business Engineering student from Colombia who is passionate about learning. She loves traveling the world and connecting with different cultures. Her dream is to be a world citizen and help others learn about the things she loves, including Spanish, her native language, and her culture. Connect with Maria on LinkedIn.

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